The Feminist Lactivist Manifesto

Sep 14th 2012

If you consume contemporary feminist media, you’ll quickly notice there’s no shortage of feminists marking down breastfeeding as an act of oppression. Mothers who breastfeed are told we’re siding with the patriarchy by participating in this maternal act, that we will “not work in any meaningful way” so long as we’re breastfeeding, and that lactation itself is some sort of internalized sexism. To some feminists, our lactating breasts are just plain wrong.

Meanwhile, mothers are fired from jobs for breastfeeding. We’re kicked out of public spaces and shamed across the internet for breastfeeding. We’re told by family, friends, and ignorant providers that we’ll fail anyway and it’s not a worthwhile use of our time. We’re told breastfeeding is the best thing for our babies, but denied the time, support and resources we need to make it work. We are often forced to choose between breastfeeding and employment, and our desire to breastfeed is quite often the collateral damage of being the only industrialized nation in the world with zero paid maternity leave. We are told we’re not breastfeeding enough, or we’re breastfeeding too much. We are blamed when it doesn’t work, and shamed when it does.

With a billion dollar infant formula industry keeping politicians in their back pocket, unethical and predatory marketing practices go completely unchecked. Over the last 50 years, infant formula marketing has led an aggressive campaign to convince women and their families that we cannot be trusted to feed our babies without use of their product. This marketing message becomes fact when our hospitals and doctors, who receive incentives from the formula companies, push formula and dole out inaccurate breastfeeding information. These messages become fact when those hospitals feed our premature babies infant formula instead of safer, healthier donor breastmilk. These messages become fact when we’re forced to return to work before breastfeeding is established or denied the right to express our breastmilk on the job. They become fact when society shames women who breastfeed their babies whenever, wherever they’re hungry.

Our culture has made it clear to women: either you can be a breastfeeding mom, or you move freely through the world, but you can’t do both. To me, this battle for our right to unencumbered bodily autonomy falls under the most fundamental principles of feminism.

Analogously, feminists would not tolerate people being shamed for menstruating. We would not tolerate an industry that makes billions of dollars a year capitalizing on that shame. We would not tolerate our healthcare providers accepting incentives to toe that party line. We would not tolerate work places that make it difficult or impossible to tend to our menstruation. We would not tolerate a legal system that allows women to be fired for menstruating. So why are so many feminists content to perpetuate that same discrimination toward lactating women?

I, for one, am not, and I have developed a manifesto to outline the ways in which I will use my privilege, power, and voice as a feminist activist to level the playing field for families so they make make real choices about the way they feed their babies.

The Feminist Lactivist Manifesto

I will recognize that breastfeeding is a public health issue, a human rights issue, a civil rights issue, and a feminist issue.

I will trust that women can handle non-judgmental scientific information regarding the benefits and risks of all infant feeding methods, and will not shield them from best available evidence.

I will remember that non-judgmental, evidence-based information about infant feeding is NOT an attack on the way I feed my baby, and that those who DO attack are not speaking for the movement as a whole.

I will support a mother (and father) no matter how they choose to feed their baby, whether by breastfeeding, exclusive pumping, donor milk, formula, or any combination.

I will recognize that the “choice” in infant feeding is a privileged concept and that many mothers may not have the support, time, means, resources, or education to make a fully informed choice, and that needs to change.

I will acknowledge the staggering statistic that only 6% of the births in the United States occur in “Baby Friendly” hospitals, which means that in 94% of births, women are facing well-known barriers to breastfeeding from the moment the baby is born, and that needs to change.

I will remember that breastfeeding women have a lower risk of female cancers, diabetes, depression, and other illnesses than non-breastfeeding women, and their babies have a lower risk of obesity, diabetes, asthma, gastrointestinal problems, and other illness.

I will also remember that donor milk and/or formula can save both a mother and her baby’s life when breastfeeding is not right for them.

I will recognize that medical professionals often have little to no training or education in breastfeeding or lactation in general, which often leads to bad advice and sabotaged nursing relationships, and that needs to change.

I will remember that, despite the various state laws protecting a woman’s legal right to breastfeed anywhere she is otherwise authorized to be, women are constantly harassed, humiliated, shamed, and/or removed from public spaces simply for breastfeeding their babies, and that needs to change.

I will remember that, despite the perceived public judgment against formula-feeding mothers, no one has ever been kicked out of Victoria’s Secret for bottle-feeding their baby.

I will recognize that, in America today, Breastfeeding is a radical act. With only 16.3% of mothers nationwide meeting the AAP minimum guidelines for breastfeeding, formula is still the mainstream and most accepted form of infant feeding, and that needs to change.

I will remember that, despite the various state and federal laws protecting a mother’s right to pump breastmilk at work, some employers and/or employment situations make this task difficult or impossible, and that needs to change.

I will recognize that partners play a major role in the success of a breastfeeding relationship, and give them due credit when they help a mother reach her breastfeeding goals.

I will hold partners and family accountable for participating in the work of breastfeeding in any way they can.

I will work to promote access to donor milk so mothers have another option beside formula if breastfeeding is not right for their family.

I will acknowledge that not everyone who breastfeeds identifies as a woman, and that my views must remain inclusive of all people.

I will use my power as an activist to fight for a woman’s right to evidence-based breastfeeding support, the right to breastfeed in public unencumbered, the right to express milk when she is away from her baby, and the right to feed her baby by other means if breastfeeding is not the right feeding method for her family.

__________________________________________

If you agree with this manifesto, please comment and share….

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46 Responses to “The Feminist Lactivist Manifesto”

  1. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Sing it sister!



  2. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Yes! To every word, yes!



  3. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    As a full-time career mom who also happens to be pregnant, nursing a 3-year-old, and identifies as a feminist, I hear you, support you, and join you. Keep on, mama!!



  4. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Awesome.




  5. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Yes yes yes yes yes. Thank you!



  6. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Preach!
    http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m6m22mauOS1qg6qli.gif



  7. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    I had a first and second favorite statement picked out, but as I look at the list over and over, I just don’t know exactly which statement I like the most! It MIGHT be the third statement about evidence-based information, because people tend to get snippy with me about when I say I support hospitals banning free formula samples. I mean, they’re not STOPPING people from using formula, they’re just trying to make it easier on breastfeeding moms. Healthcare professionals are supposed to support all mothers and whatever they choose, not throw marketing at them, especially after a trial such as birth.
     
    Also, thanks for the link about Mitt Romney, I knew there were more reasons I’m voting for Obama that I hadn’t seen yet.
     



  8. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Awesome. Sharing:)
     



  9. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Wonderful!  I want to print that out and put it on my fridge.  LOVE the Victoria’s Secret comment.  I know your manifesto is serious, but that part actually made me laugh, due to the ridiculous truth of it!



  10. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Rock on!
     
    If a mom is asking for help, she should get it,  no matter who she is or what her odds are of success.  
     
    At 24 hours old, they offered me formula because my milk hadn’t come in.   I even asked to see a lactation specialist and the nurse said, well, if I can’t help you, no one can, you don’t need a specialist you need formula. That moment drove me every single feeding when I had to pump before and after, for six months, oh that made me mad.  No one should “decide” whether you should be “helped” to feed your own baby!  



    • TracyVetzalMainwaring | Profile
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       @fayebond
       I’ve never met a woman who’s milk had come in at 24 hours.  Even with my third, and nursing every 60-90 minutes to prevent engorgement, it was still day 3 that milk (instead of colostrum) came in.  So sad that the people we are supposed to trust don’t even have basic knowledge.



  11. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    love!



  12. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Shared, and SO agree.  I’m currently having a bit of a fit because the empty visitor office I usually use to pump in during my lunch break is filled with… visitors!  It shouldn’t be this way. 



  13. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Bravo!



  14. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    What a wonky thing for feminists to take issue with. Makes me sad, frankly. I don’t even want to think about it anymore. BUT thank you for writing this. I wholeheartedly agree.



  15. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    RIGHT ON!!!



  16. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    I totally appreciate this right now.  I’ve been so damn angry the past few days.  I know I shouldn’t have, but my baby is sick and I was off work today and spent the day reading articles about Prof. Adrienne Pine along with all of the comments.  I’m fucking mad.  
     
    I blogged about this today, the first blog post in weeks, and only the third on my blog.  It got me THAT riled up.  Thanks for taking the time to write this.  I love it and will be sharing :)



  17. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    I’m usually a lurker but had to comment that I too am a Feminist Lactivist and this article is very appreciated.  I can’t wait to be able to give the support to my own friends and family that I did not have in the beginning.  I didn’t give up though and we had a great breastfeeding relationship until my baby self-weaned!



  18. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Im so glad I work where I do. I work at a county hospital in Houston as a nurse in labor and delivery. We transition our babies at the bedside so no nursery unless baby is sick so we can help establish breast feeding. We have lactation consultants available 24/7 for encouragement and troubleshooting when our breast feeding in serviced nurses can’t solve the problem. And we pooled our personal money to outfit the pumping room for moms whose babies are in the nicu when the rebuild wasn’t in the budget. My co workers and I also have a nice room we can pump and or feed our babies if significant others can bring them up. If feeding is necessary breast first if breast isn’t an option we syringe feed formula. But we’re county. We get paid primarily by tax dollars rarely by insurance and substandard my Medicaid. We do what’s best for the patients, what’s healthiest for them. Makes me proud to work for the county.



  19. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Graduate school agrees with you!

    This is utterly fantastic. It’s right on, it’s not about judging the choices of others, it’s about realizing that societal pressures and corporations are throwing their weight around heavily influencing this issue!!



  20. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    The Basis Health Monitor touts being able to track your heart rate accurately and in real time without the need for a chest strap. The devices does this through a unique camera and lights system and the camera in the middle takes several pictures a second as green lights flanked on both sides reflect light off your capillaries, Those ‘light pulse’ pictures are then interpreted by the basis watch and a readout is given. But the band doesn’t stop there, as it is designed to be a complete activity tracker with the addition of an accelerometer, thermometer, and perspiration sensor. <a href=”https://www.rx247.net/levitra.html”>Levitra Online</a>



  21. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    You go woman! I am right there with you! And so proud to be of the 16.3%!



  22. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    I love a well written manifesto :) Thanks Gina!



  23. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Thank you for writing The Feminist Lactivist Manifesto.  May we translate it into Spanish?  



  24. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Even in a workplace that is breastfeeding neutral (I use my breaks to pump in an empty office and no one seems to care), breastfeeding and working is still difficult. I travel quite a bit for work and vowed not to leave my kiddo overnight until she was at least 6 months old. That means anytime I travel for work I have to go through all kinds of shenanigans–taking my own vehicle, reduced (or not at all) reimbursement for gas, arranging and paying for child care wherever I go, and so on. We need to start recognizing the breastfeeding mother and baby as a single unit and account for that in laws and regulations. I’ve been told “we can’t make special exceptions for moms traveling with babies,” but the result is essentially discrimination. I do appreciate the support I have received so far, but something needs to change on a larger scale.



  25. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    I finally made the time to read this. I am actually reading this while nursing my four yr old…who after being weaned for over six month begged to nurse again and one middle of the night crying episode I finally gave in. I was so scared to tell anyone. She only nurses to sleep, and not every night even. But still, shame kept me from telling anyone. Why should I be ashamed? Well…thanks to a wonderful friend who totally validated that she obviously needs the comfort right now and this post, I’m done hiding. No more shame. Thank you Gina.



  26. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Yes! This! All of this. Will be sharing on the blog and FB later today.
     
    So glad I found you, Gina.



  27. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Words can not express how I much I LOVE this!



  28. TracyVetzalMainwaring | Profile
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    Just after I read this, I read my new issue of Chatelaine (a Canadian fashion/style magazine).  There was an article on investing and   they said we’re in a baby boom, so it’s a great area to invest in.  “So what are some baby-friendly brands?  Nestle…..”  (October 2012, pag 214).  I nearly choked on my coffee!  I posted on their FB page, I wonder if they’ll keep it on there.



  29. LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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    What feminists are these? I am the MS state president and a board member of NOW and we are constantly talking about the need for women to have access to breaks for pumping, paid maternity leave and we even had the Radical Doula speak on one of our panels at the national conference this year.  My chapter has taken on the increasing doulas and midwifery in the state as a chapter goal. We see birth rights as a human rights and feminist issue. While as a doula I support women who find that breastfeeding is not right for them. I am NOT of the mind that breastfeeding is some kind of oppression. That is insane. I do think the feeling that we who support breastfeeding are shaming women who don’t is extreme and should be avoided. I personally feel breastfeeding in public and saying their is no shame in my female body and that I am more than a sexual object is itself a FEMINIST ACT.  



  30. LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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    BTW I LOVE THIS MANIFESTO!!! I love the fact that it recognizes that choices aren’t always “choices” and we have to support women regardless I am tired of being told because I pro NCB and BF that I am against everything else I am for women having the power to CHOSE what is best for HER and HER CHILD without pressure and WITH unbiased information. 



  31. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    wonderful!  As a full-time working mom who breastfed for 6+years It is entirely possible to breastfeed and work full time and it is most definitely a feminist issue.  I used to share with others that I breastfed both of my children for 3+ years, but they always looked at me like I was crazy.  Now I tell them that Michael Jordan breastfed for 6 years and they look interested and begin considering the merits of long term breastfeeding.  We live in a celebrity focused culture…  seems to be the easiest way to alter people minds and perceptions is to invoke a celebrity that supports your stance.



  32. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Excellent!  I love this, and will definitely share.  Great work =)  Keep spinning all those plates, you’re doing a spanking good job and your kids will grow up in awe of you, the love you give them, and everything you were able to accomplish.  You’re an inspiration.  



  33. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    I love this post, thank you so much for saying this! 
    I may be naive, but I do believe in some areas of our country, times are changing. I live in Southern California, and though my experiences are not shared by all mothers, I have had an incredible amount of support in breastfeeding my baby, even from complete strangers. I made a point to look for a baby friendly place to have my baby. Originally I was going to have her at a birth center, but ended up in a hospital for a c-section. (Not happy about the c-section, but was not willing to risk a vaginal breech delivery when no doctors in my area were licensed or qualified to assist. My baby was 5 days over due and I was having contractions during the routine post-date testing.) Both places were supportive of breastfeeding. My only complaint is while at the hospital the lactation consultant (of all people!) pushed formula for my baby because she wasn’t feeding readily in the first day or two. At birth she was 9 pounds 1 ounce, and even though she was losing weight in the first couple of days, she leveled off by day 3 when we were released, and had lost no more than 8% (I understand 10% is the cut off for what’s “acceptable”). At her size, I really wasn’t that concerned about her weight loss either, and knew she would gain it back once feeding was established. But regardless, formula was pushed. She got one meal of formula, because I was pressured and had no support or information available to avoid it. That one meal made her so uncomfortable and gassy that she cried the entire next day – NOT a good experience for a tired, first-time mom who couldn’t get any sleep while in the hospital! After that she has not had a single drop of formula since. She’s now going on 8 months old, and has been breastfed then entire time, is in the 95th percentile for length and 50-75th percentile for weight, meeting all her milestones, and healthy as can be! I was extremely blessed to be able to take off nearly 6 months for maternity leave, and had state disability and paid family leave available and a working husband to help get us through that period financially (it wasn’t easy though, we did have to budget quite a bit and are still budgeting, 2 months later, trying to “catch up”). All of my coworkers have been extremely supportive of me breastfeeding, and are extremely understanding and accommodating when I need to take “breaks” to pump. I am blessed to have the relationship with my coworkers that I do so it isn’t overly awkward when we are out in the field (I’m a biologist) and I have to pump in the same car or on the other side of a bush! (Fun times!) I was fortunate to find a pediatrician who is staunchly pro-breastfeeding, and a caregiver for my baby who feels the same (she breastfed her baby until he was almost 3 years old, at which time he self weaned). I have been freely able to breastfeed my baby in public, and the only comments I’ve gotten have been supportive and encouraging. I haven’t noticed so much as a dirty look from strangers. For me it’s been an amazing journey, with more support than I ever imagined I would have.BUT I know it isn’t the same for every woman. With what little trouble I had in the beginning with the formula being pushed on my baby, I completely understand why it is so hard for so many women to start and continue breastfeeding. With so many women needing to go back to work early, because they don’t have paid family leave or disability available, don’t have a working spouse, or otherwise just can’t afford it, I can understand how it is so hard to really get established in the beginning, knowing you’ll be going back to work. As easy as it’s been for me, I did have difficulty initially going back to work – there was no pumping station for me. One woman (works in the same office but not for my company) even told me to go pump in the bathroom because the conference room I was using wasn’t available at the time. This embarrassment and awkwardness was very hard to deal with, and if that’s a normal occurrence, I completely understand why so many women stop breastfeeding when they do go back to work! It’s important to be supportive of all women, regardless of their choice, as long as they are not outright neglecting or abusing their children. I am so glad to see your post, this is exactly the kind of support women need. And even though I’ve had an amazing amount of support, I want to stand up to continue to support other women so they too can have the good experiences I have.



  34. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    But aren’t you judging Hanna Rosin for her choices and struggles with breastfeeding? So it’s a choice as long as it doesn’t conflict with what you believe? That doesn’t make sense.



    • LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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      @ashleymack I can personally say as a doula I don’t judge my clients or anyone who doesn’t nurse or struggles I understand fully actually I struggled and I bottle fed after nursing for awhile. I don’t feel like a bad mother. I will say Hanna Rosen’s article means nothing to me as a black women in poor/working class Mississippi. Most women of color I know are actively discouraged from breastfeeding.  This whole feminist conversation about being judged for not breastfeeding is frankly some classist upper class white women’s problems to me. When she talks about the benefits being thin, maybe, and perhaps those “thin” benefits don’t matter as much for babies that have the luck of birth stacked in their favor but for other babies who need every boost in life they can get breastfeeding REALLY matters. They are exposed to more pollutants, have less access to nutrition, usually lower air quality at home, higher risk for allergies, higher chance of SIDS, the list goes on. IF BF fights back the impacts of these negatives in anyway for these babies born with the odds against them then YES BF matters a whole hell of a lot.



      • VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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        @LaurieBertramRoberts  @ashleymack I agree with you that Rosin has a lot of privilege, and that we should recognize and discuss that. All I am saying is I think its a bit hypocritical to say that being a feminist lactivist means you are open to women making their own choices (no matter what those choices are), but then in the same breath criticize Rosin for expressing her opinion about her choice to breastfeed (which cannot be extrapolated for her particular racial, economic, and cultural situation). I think its odd to compete with each other about experiences. So your experience as a doula and as someone who struggled but doesnt feel like a bad mother is a valid true experience, but Rosin’s story of struggle isnt valid or important or useful because she is privileged? I think the logic of EVERYONE HAS DIFFERENT EXPERIENCES is important and I agree with this. But the author of this post cant say they respect that, and then jump on someone who has a different experience than them. Thats odd.



        • LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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          @ashleymack I didn’t say her experience isn’t valid in fact I think it is. The point I am trying to make that you missed and many white women continue to miss is that this conversation about judgement for NOT breastfeeding is largely YOUR issue and not a broader issue shared among other races and classes. I personally think the whole issue is stupid we can encourage breastfeeding and still honor women who chose not to there is room for both. However, Rosin’s claims about breastfeeding’s benefits being a debatable subject was false. As a feminist who is actually a leader in a national feminist organisation it irks me to now have to speak to the notion that feminists are anti breastfeeding when Rosin could have wrote a more measured response to her issues like Jessica Valenti did in http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jessica-valenti/decision-to-stop-breastfeeding_b_1864954.html



        • VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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          @LaurieBertramRoberts The point you missed is that I was not supporting Rosins claims. I was not refuting yours. My original post was referring to a strange double-standard I noticed in the author of this posts logic about being open to women choosing what they want. I  just think that double standard is not helpful and that is what I was posting about (and actually distracts from the important arguments you bring up). I also think its not helpful to  dismiss my comments because you are making unfounded claims about my race or something being my issue (you dont know my cultural or racial heritage, my experience or whether or not I think this is my issue). But in response to your claims about breastfeeding science, as a feminist scholar and health activist, I do sometimes find it troubling that we don’t look as closely as we can at scientific discourses and studies about breastfeeding, maternity, and the like. Despite privileged and elitest claims about work and family life, I found Rosin’s analysis of the scientific literature interesting, but for different reason. Breastfeeding studies are almost ALL correlative studies. This means that they cannot highlight causality but correlation. Does that mean we shouldn’t breastfeed? No. That it isn’t important? No. But that is an important distinction, because it is reckless to use correlative science to make causal claims (I know in the city where I work I think its pretty problematic that some health practitioners use this correlative research to tell poor mothers of color that they are killing their children because they dont or cant breastfeed). On this very website, the author has a post where they cite a study that examined infant mortality and said that 95% of the babies that died, died of things that BF has correlatively been shown to reduce the risk of. This does not mean that those mothers didnt breastfeed, nor that breastfeeding would have stopped their babies deaths with all certainty. Yet, the author wrote “This week the Journal of Pediatrics published some very serious new findings indicating that 911 babies in America die every year from not being breastfed.” I think that this kind of misrepresentation is problematic. And I can say that while not being anti-breastfeeding. The women”s health movement was built on the notion that we should have a healthy skepticism about narratives of science and medicine (history shows that they dont always work in women’s best interests). As feminist activists we vehemently fight against the use of correlative research that proves women who have abortions are more likely to get breast cancer; but we celebrate correlative research that says women who breastfeed are less likely to get it. That is problematic to me. I think we can be careful skeptics about science and not be “anti-breastfeeding.” All I know is that I am pro-mother. I dont think we disagree about that.



        • LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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          @anm768 I agree with you and as I doula and a human services professional I too find the over reaching and alarmist statements unneeded. I am sorry for the poor wording in my statement (I feel like Mitt Romney now eek!) it was not meant to be offensive. I am probably being hypersensitive due to a long week of dealing with very insensitive women. That said I actually think you and I agree about pretty much everything I know I am working hard within NOW to shine a light on birth work and the state of birth in America but its hard when we are having a new version of the “mommy wars”. It doesn’t make sense to me. To me a woman no more has to justify why she BF than why she has an abortion. Do I believe ideally BF is better yes of course I do but that is also ideally. When a mother isn’t on a ton of meds, has good nutrition, ect.  I am a reproductive justice advocate as such I support a woman’s right to parent not only when or if she wants but HOW she wants. GO MOMS!



    • VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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      @anm768 How did I in ANY way judge Hannah Rosin for any choice she’s ever made in her life? What I’m judging her for is her wording and her insistence that women CANNOT work and breastfeed at the same time. That’s all. Anything else is a strawman argument.



      • LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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        @TheFeministBreeder  @anm768 I will agree her argument that women can not work and BF is garbage especially when I watch women who work in non supportive hourly jobs fight to be able to work and BF. If it was hard or not possible for HER she needs to say THAT and state that for some it is an insurmountable barrier. Let’s be real for many its not only doable but not terribly challenging. Their is a whole continuum of experiences. I am not understanding the all or nothing type of discussions.



  35. LaurieBertramRoberts | Profile
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    the bottomline to me on both sides of this debate if you are spending time judging other women’s parenting choices and you call yourself a feminist you may want to go read up about reproductive justice because part of RJ is the right to parent not just when you want but HOW you want. Yes fighting for the RIGHT to BF is a feminist issue. Fighting for the right of women to be informed IS a feminist issue. What they do with that info is called free will and a woman’s business.



  36. VA:R_U [1.9.22_1171]
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    Finally!  It is SO refreshing to see someone else who is pro-breastfeeding on the internet and not afraid to say so.  All I have seen recently are articles talking about how formula is just as good, moms who breastfeed abuse moms who formula feed, and each woman has a right to choose what she wants.  Obviously, choosing what you want means not breastfeeding.  If you believe in breastfeeding – out of the club you go.  You make us feel inferior, so let’s abuse you.
    Thank you for this post, for the research and the links, and for stating what everyone should have the courage to say.



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